Phnom penh

Phnom Penh is the capital and largest city of Cambodia. It is a center of security, politics, economics, cultural heritage, and diplomacy. The Capital was additionally modified its boundary in four stages. Those stages are: 
* 1st Stage: Add up Dangkor District 
* 2nd Stage: The creation of Khan Russey Keo 
* 3rd Stage: The integration of 4 villages from Kanthork Commune to Phnom Penh territory 
* 4th Stage: The integration of 20 communes from 5 Districts (Ponnhear Leu, Mok Kampoul, Khien Svay, Kandal Steung, Angsnoul) of Kandal Province to Phnom Penh.

Geography

Phnom Penh is located in the south-central region of Cambodia, at the confluence of the Tonlé Sap, Mekong, and Bassac rivers. These rivers provide potential freshwater and river ecosystems as important resources for sustainable environment conditions, nature's beauty and a prosperous culture for the people of Phnom Penh City from the past to the present. 

Phnom Penh lies in front of the Mekong River, which is the main river in Asia with a length of 4,200km (2610 miles). The original source of the river is from the highlands of Tibet China. The river crosses Cambodia from North to South with a total length of 486km (302 miles) and passes Phnom Penh as an intersection of the river to create attractive freshwater and ecosystems for the city.

Climate

The climate is hot year-round with only minor variations. City temperatures range from 18° to 38 °C (64° to 100 °F).
There are two seasons: 

·         Dry season lasts from December to May (6 months) 

·         Rainy season lasts from June to November (6 months)

Land Area and Population

Area

Population

Women

No. of Households

Density

Khan

Sangkat

Village

678.46 Km2

0.37% of country's total area

1,501,725 people

792,926 people

295,358

2,213 people/Km2

8

96

897

Cleck here to view full map: http://www.phnompenh.gov.kh/district.php

 

Economy

·         GDP per capita is 769 UDS (2009); the GDP per capita for Phnom Penh is 820 USD (2005)

·         Investment ៖ ¾ of industrial investments in the whole country

·         Transportation ៖ ¾ of the whole country

·         Tourism ៖ 950,000 people/year

·         Growth Economic Corridor

·         West-East axe ៖ Bangkok-Phnom Penh-Ho Chi Minh (Roads, Railways, Airway)

·         North-South axe ៖ Sihanouk Ville (Port)-Phnom Penh-Upper Mekong region (Roads, Railway, Mekong Navigation etc.) 

 

Notable Data

In Phnom Penh, by June 2011, civil servants compose of 24%, staffs and workers 26%, service providers 36% and farmers 14%.

Social Affairs

Description

Percentage

2010

Families have members work in state cadre

%

23.48

Families have members work in private sectors

%

26.54

Families who are service providers

%

35.68

Families as farmers

%

14.32

Tate of dropped out of school children aged 6-14

%

9.04

Rate of illiterates aged from 15-60

%

2.21

Rate of illiterate women aged from 15-60

%

1.24

Families get access to running tap water

%

81.10

Families use water wells

%

5.95

Families have clean toilets

%

91.53

Rate of infants mortality (0-1month)/10,000birth

%

0.59

 

Constructions

Figures up to end of November 2011 


High-Built Structures

1.     Building with 10 to 19 floors              : 50 Buildings

2.     Building with 20 to 29 floors              : 02 Buildings

3.     Building with 30 to 39 floors              : 03 Buildings

4.     Building with 40 to 45 floors              : 02 Buildings

Total: 57 Buildings that 13 of them were completed its construction and 45 buildings are under construction.

Borey (Housing Complex) in Phnom Penh

There are 77 Borey (Housing complex) constructed within territory some districts as listed below: 
 

1.     Dangkor District                   : 27 Sites

2.     Russey Keo District             : 17 Sites

3.     Sen Sok District                   : 19 Sites

4.     Mean Chey District              : 08 Sites

5.     Chamkarmon District         : 04 Sites

6.     Toul Kork District                 : 02 Sites

Transport

Capital has in total 27 bridges with the length of 5,429.177 meters.

Description

AC Roads

DBST Roads

Concrete Roads

Total

Phnom Penh

215,286.00

279,753.00

206,730.00

1,379,487.00

Daun Penh

29,800.00

12,730.00

1,649.00

43,810.00

Chamkamon

29,521.00

53,646.00

21,377.00

105,528.00

7 Makara

29,800.00

12,730.00

1,649.00

22,264.00

Toul Kork

5,500.00

64,067.00

32,453.00

117,924.00

Mean Cheay

11,980.00

14,720.00

57,953.00

143,490.00

Dangkor

-

38,788.00

22,067.00

451,767.00

Sen Sok

-

3,860.00

7,710.00

105,528.00

Russey Keo

7,020.00

18,409.00

62,241.00

186,528.00

****Length Measurement is in Metric (Data from department of public works and transport) 

 

Vehicle Registration Data​ (August 2006 to August 2011)

No.

Type of Vehicle

Number Registered

1

Sedan

94,782

2

Truck

8,213

3

Motorcycle

562,623

Tricycle

1,137

5

Motorcycle with cart/trolley

3,336

 

Poverty Rate (2005-2010) in percentage (%)

District

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Chamkamon

6.89

6.05

0.003

0.02

0.00

0.00

Daun Penh

5.36

4.39

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

7 Makara

2.22

1.78

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

Toul Kork

5.92

5.63

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

Dangkor

7.64

4.59

1.41

0.83

0.28

0.13

Mean Cheay

11.11

10.90

0.13

0.54

0.21

0.13

Russey Keo

12.68

12.44

1.81

1.32

1.27

0.69

Sen Sok

12.83

12.83

1.64

0.61

1.41

0.12

 

History (Phnom Penh History)

 

The origin of Phnom Penh's name

Long ago in 1372 A.D., there was a wealthy elderly woman named Penh living near the banks of the four river fronts. Her house was built on a plateau east of a hill. One day, heavy rains flooded the area. Daun Penh (Grandma Penh) went down to the dock and saw a koki tree floating towards the river bank. The strong fronting tides kept the koki tree floating nearby that particular river bank. 

Immediately, Daun Penh called for her neighbors to help get the tree out of the river. They tied a rope to the tree and gradually pulled it out of the water. While Daun Penh was wiping the mud off of the tree, she saw four Buddha bronze statues and a stone statue of Divinity in the hole of the tree trunk. The statue of Divinity was standing and held a bat in one hand and a conch shell in the other. 

Daun Penh and her neighbors were very happy to see those sacred objects and paraded them to Daun Penh’s house. She arranged to have a small hut built to temporarily house the statues. 

Later, Daun Penh called on her neighbors again for help to pile up more dirt on the hill west of her house. The koki tree was then cut and fashioned to become pillars of the temple which would be built on that hill. 

In 1372 A.D., Daun Penh and her neighbors all agreed to build a temple with a thatch roof on the hill. The four Buddha statues were placed in the temple, while the statue of Divinity was kept in a shrine at the east base of the mountain, for she thought that the statue was from Laos because of its appearance and name “Neakta Preah, Chao” which is what is has been called ever since. 

After the temple was built, Daun Penh invited monks to stay at the base of that hill. Since then, it was been called Wat Phnom Daun Penh, also presently known as Wat Phnom. 

 

Formation of the City

Phnom Penh City was first built in the 15th century during King Preah Srey Soryopor’s (Ponhea Yat) time, when he abandoned Angkor Palace and built a new one at Tuol Basan in Srey Sar Chhor province, which is now called Srey Santhor district, Kampong Cham province.

The king stayed there for only one year due to flooding every rainy season. He moved and built a new city along the bank of Tonle Chaktomuk (Four Faces River) in 1934, which is now Phnom Penh City today. 

There were two phases in the construction of the Royal Palace in Phnom Penh City: 

Phase One: During King Preah Ponhea Yat’s reign in the 15th century. 
Phase Two: During King Norodom’s reign in the 19th century. 

There were two phases of construction because after Phase One (1434 – 1497), the king’s palace was moved back to Angkor. After it was built in Angkor, it was then moved to Pursat, then Boaribo, next to Longvek, and then Oudong. After Oudong, the Palace was built again in Phnom Penh City in 1865 and has stayed there ever since.

 

Phnom Penh during Pol Pot Regime

When the Khmer Rouge Regime took place on April 17, 1975, people were forcefully evacuated out of the city. Infrastructure was seriously destroyed and within 3 years, 8 months and 20 days, Phnom Penh was a ghost city. 
After liberation day, January 7, 1979, people returned to their normal lives. The authorities and the people altogether endeavored to protect the nation from falling into the genocidal regime again, to restore the country, and got over many difficulties to improve the image of Phnom Penh according to the development trend of the nation. 


 

Phnom Penh today

It has been a long road to the peaceful and growing Phnom Penh of today. With the country now stabilised, Phnom Penh is steadily being restored to former glories. 
Today Phnom Penh is a charming, relaxing and harmonious city, ...